NASA Releases More Dates For Future Shuttle Launches

I know this may seem like old news to many of you, but I recently went on NASA official website to make sure that the Space Shuttle Discovery was still launching on February 12th.  While looking through their schedule, I a few more  dates added for future launches into January of 2010 where three launches are already on the schedule! 

I’ve compiled the list of all launches including non-shuttle ones up to the end of next year.  These launches do not include any not launching on the Space Coast.  If you think you might want to take a trip down to witness a launch, here’s a link from Kennedy Space Center’s official website on launch tickets.

 

NASA/Kim Shiflett
Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

STS-119 Mission Specialists Steve Swanson (right), Joseph Acaba and Richard Arnold practice using a camera that will be used on the mission during crew training at Kennedy Space Center on Florida’s Space Coast..

 

February 12, 2009 11:00 pm Shuttle Discovery • STS-119 The STS-119 will be the 28th U.S. mission to the International Space Station. The flight will deliver the Starboard 6 truss segment, giving the station its fourth and final set of power-generating solar wings. Please be sure to check back often as shuttle launches are usually delayed or rescheduled.Launch time: 7.30 a.m.
March 05, 2009 T.B.A. Delta II Kepler The United Launch Alliance Delta 2 rocket will launch NASA’s Kepler spacecraft to discover and characterize hundreds of planets. The rocket will fly in the 7925 vehicle configuration. Launch time: 10:48 p.m..
April 01, 2009 08:00 am Delta 2 STSS Demo The United Launch Alliance Delta 2 rocket will launch the Space Tracking and Surveillance System (STSS) technology demonstration mission for the Missile Defense Agency. Launch time: noon
April 06, 2009 noon Delta 4 • Goes 0 The United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket will launch the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite O, or GOES O, for NASA and NOAA. The weather satellite will orbit 22,300 miles above the planet to monitor conditions across the U.S. The rocket will fly in the Medium+ (4,2) configuration with two solid rocket boosters. Launch time: noon
April 10, 2009 noon Delta 2 • Kepler The United Launch Alliance Delta 2 rocket will launch NASA’s Kepler spacecraft to discover and characterize hundreds of planets. Launch time: 12:00 P.M.
April 24, 2009 T.B.A. Atlas 5 • LRO The United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter to the moon and a lunar impactor secondary payload called the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite. The rocket will fly in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Noon launch time
April 24, 2009 noon Atlas 5 • LRO The United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter to the moon and a lunar impactor secondary payload called the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite. The rocket will fly in the 401 vehicle configuration with a four-meter fairing, no solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Launch time 12:00 p.m.
May 12, 2009 T.B.A. Shuttle Atlantis • STS 125 STS-125 will be the fifth and final space shuttle mission launched to service and upgrade the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. Shuttle Atlantis will launch two new science instruments, along with stabilizing gyroscopes, batteries and thermal blankets to refurbish the observatory and extend its useful life another five years. The astronauts plan to conduct five spacewalks during the service call. Attempts to repair two other instruments are planned as well. Please be sure to check back often as shuttle launches are usually delayed or rescheduled. Launch time: 1:11 p.m.
May 15, 2009 T.B.A. Shuttle Endeavour • STS 127 STS-127 will be the 29th U.S. mission to the International Space Station. The flight will deliver the external experiment platform for the Japanese science laboratory facilities. Please be sure to check back often as shuttle launches are usually delayed or rescheduled. Launch time: 7:05 p.m.
July 11, 2009 noon Ares I-X Test Flight The Ares I-X test flight is NASA’s first test flight for the Agency’s new Constellation launch vehicle — Ares I. The Ares I-X flight will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I.
July 30, 2009 noon Atlas 5 • AEHF 1 The United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket will launch the first Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) satellite. Built by Lockheed Martin, this U.S. military spacecraft will provide highly-secure communications. The rocket will fly in the 531 vehicle configuration with a five-meter fairing, three solid rocket boosters and a single-engine Centaur upper stage. Launch 12:00 p.m.
August 06, 2009 T.B.A. Shuttle Atlantis • STS 128 STS-128 will be the 30th U.S. mission to the International Space Station. The flight will deliver equipment and supplies with a reusable Multi-Purpose Logistics Module.Please be sure to check back often as shuttle launches are usually delayed or rescheduled. Launch Time: noon
September 26, 2009 T.B.A. Delta II Kepler The United Launch Alliance Delta 2 rocket will launch NASA’s Kepler spacecraft to discover and characterize hundreds of planets. Launch time noon.
October 08, 2009 T.B.A. Atlas V • United Launch Alliance The Mars Science Laboratory is a rover that will assess whether Mars ever was, or is still today, an environment able to support microbial life and to determine the planet’s habitability. Launch time: noon
November 12, 2009 T.B.A. Space Shuttle Discover – STS 129 Space shuttle Discovery will deliver components including two spare gyroscopes, two nitrogen tank assemblies, two pump modules, an ammonia tank assembly and a spare latching end effector for the station’s robotic arm to the International Space Station.
December 10, 2009 T.B.A. Space Shuttle Endeavor – STS 130 Space shuttle Endeavour will deliver the final connecting node, Node 3, and the Cupola, a robotic control station with six windows around its sides and another in the center that provides a 360-degree view around the International Space Station.

 

NASA.GOV – January Launches

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